The historical development of Engineering Higher Education and implications on future teaching and learning - bridging the skills gap

Downie, Candice (2016) The historical development of Engineering Higher Education and implications on future teaching and learning - bridging the skills gap. Practice and Research in Education (3).

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Abstract

The introduction of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the UK was protracted, initially driven by scientific developments but ultimately shaped and enhanced by industrial demand. The current focus of widening participation, engaging students from less conventional academic backgrounds is further compounded by the need to satisfy the STEM, (particularly engineering) shortfall in the UK, hence alternative approaches to encourage young people into such areas is being supported via more expansive routes into higher education. This has opened some particularly educationally profound avenues such as University Technical Colleges, and also via HE in FE: supporting Higher Apprenticeship Schemes and delivering Foundation Degrees. The teaching and learning styles employed in undergraduate engineering, although highly researched still display some evidence of historical methods and traditional didactic teaching styles. These approaches have the potential to both impose additional pressure on and de-motivate students from less traditional vocationally orientated backgrounds.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: HE in FE, engineering education, engineering history, teaching / learning methods, vocational engineering, widening participation.
Divisions: University Publications > Research > Practice & Research in Education
Depositing User: Tracey Gill
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2016 15:43
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2019 18:59
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/998

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