Assessing the effectiveness of the National Integrity System institutions in the fight against corruption: the case of Malawi Parliament

Mkandawire, Adamson Joseph Kuseri (2015) Assessing the effectiveness of the National Integrity System institutions in the fight against corruption: the case of Malawi Parliament. Masters thesis, University of Bolton.

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Abstract

The introduction of the National Integrity System (NIS) in 1998 was seen as a bold step in the fight against corruption in Malawi. But against the backdrop of numerous cases of corruption in recent times, the question to ask is; how effective are the National Integrity System institutions in fighting corruption? This motivated the research which sought to assess the effectiveness of the NIS institutions in the fight against corruption in Malawi. Using Malawi Parliament as a case study, the objectives of the research were: a) To establish effectiveness of Parliament as a National Integrity System institution in Malawi, b) To determine the level of influence of Parliament in the fight against corruption c) To recommend how Parliament as an Integrity System institution can better support the fight against corruption. Based on the case study findings, the study concludes that parliament as an integrity institution is not effective to fight against corruption ostensibly due to weak capacity which includes lack of budgets and technical skills for staff and MPs, an executive arm of government which is arrogant and uncooperative, highly divisive political and personal interests in the National Assembly making debate on corruption issues highly difficult and untenable, dismal transparency and accountability by parliament itself due to removal of legislation that would have fostered horizontal accountability of Members of Parliament and house decisions and lack of linkages and coherency with other integrity and governance institutions.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information: Electronic version of the dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Masters of Public Administration, awarded by University of Bolton in conjunction with Malawi Institute of Management.
Divisions: University of Bolton Theses > Off-campus Division
Depositing User: Tracey Gill
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2016 19:48
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2019 07:53
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/954

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