Transient resistive switching devices made from egg albumen dielectrics and dissolvable electrodes

He, Xingli, Zhang, Jian, Wang, Wenbo, Xuan, Xiaozhi, Zhang, Qilong, Smith, Charles G. and Luo, J. ORCID: 0000-0003-0310-2443 (2016) Transient resistive switching devices made from egg albumen dielectrics and dissolvable electrodes. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 8 (17). pp. 10954-10960. ISSN 1944-8244

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Official URL: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.5b10414

Abstract

Egg albumen as the dielectric, and dissolvable Mg and W as the top and bottom electrodes are used to fabricate water-soluble memristors. 4 × 4 cross-bar configuration memristor devices show a bipolar resistive switching behavior with a high to low resistance ratio in the range of 1 × 102 to 1 × 104, higher than most other biomaterial-based memristors, and a retention time over 104 s without any sign of deterioration, demonstrating its high stability and reliability. Metal filaments accompanied by hopping conduction are believed to be responsible for the switching behavior of the memory devices. The Mg and W electrodes, and albumen film all can be dissolved in water within 72 h, showing their transient characteristics. This work demonstrates a new way to fabricate biocompatible and dissolvable electronic devices by using cheap, abundant, and 100% natural materials for the forthcoming bioelectronics era as well as for environmental sensors when the Internet of things takes off.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: bipolar switch; dissolvability; egg albumen; memristors; proteins
Divisions: University of Bolton Research Centres > Institute for Materials Research and Innovation
University of Bolton Research Centres > Institute for Renewable Energy and Environmental Technologies
Depositing User: Tracey Gill
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2016 13:30
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2018 08:36
Identification Number: 10.1021/acsami.5b10414
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/927

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