Factors affecting the implementation of the Special Education Needs Disability Act (SENDA) in Higher Education built environment departments in the United Kingdom

Middlemass, Rosie, Farrell, Peter ORCID: 0000-0002-2910-6680 and Auchterlounie, Tony (2005) Factors affecting the implementation of the Special Education Needs Disability Act (SENDA) in Higher Education built environment departments in the United Kingdom. In: COBRA 2005, RICS, 2005. (Submitted)

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Abstract

In the UK, the third and final stage of the Special Education Needs Disability Act (SENDA) comes into force in October 2005; the combined stages of which serve to force Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) to comply with various standards of providing accessible education for disabled students. Using a survey instrument, sent to academics across the UK, the extent and effectiveness of SENDA compliance in the built environment (BE) subject area has been investigated for the first time. The analysis framework draws from Locke and Latham's conceptual model of goal setting theory (1979) where performance and factors contributing to performance, are measured in terms of four components: individuals' goal-based effort, their abilities, the institution support they receive and the rewards they experience from their efforts. The results suggest that fully accessible learning and teaching practices are not widespread in BE departments. In general, academics are attempting to improve accessibility, but this is dependent on their own goal-based efforts and abilities. Current initiatives to improve SENDA compliance instigated by HEIs are not influencing performance of BE academics in this area; in addition, the current job-related rewards are not motivating performance. Survey findings and analysis, point to the benefits of improving provision of training, guidance and information bespoke to the BE subject area, on overall performance levels. Also, creating links between levels of course accessibility and extrinsic rewards, by for example, acknowledging SENDA compliance in academics' performance review might prove beneficial. Ultimately, the results indicate that effective institution support is required to support the efforts of individuals.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information: This paper was given at COBRA 2005, RICS. COBRA conference papers are available at http://www.rics.org/library
Uncontrolled Keywords: built environment, disability, employee motivation, goal theory, higher education, SENDA
Divisions: School of Engineering > Civil Engineering
Depositing User: Scott Wilson
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2013 12:50
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2018 16:04
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/29

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