Emerging technologies of IoT usage in global logistics

Shah, Satya ORCID: 0000-0001-5575-7682, Rutherford, Richard and Menon, Sarath (2020) Emerging technologies of IoT usage in global logistics. 2020 International Conference on Computation, Automation and Knowledge Management (ICCAKM). IEEE. (In Press)

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Official URL: https://www.amity.edu/iccakm/

Abstract

This paper aims to summarize the current and potential capabilities of the Internet of Things (IoT) and how it contributes to Logistics Management and how it might contribute more in the digital age of the year 2050. It will be discussing the new technologies that could one day reshape logistics management and supply chain environment from what it is today into something totally different in the future. Logistics management is an evolving function that has been created, adapted and implemented into the supply chain environment. The diversification of this phenomenon the Internet of Things (IoT) with its emerging attributes are all since it is constantly in motion. The innovative solutions that have been created and can be built upon further are excessively compulsive and are non-compellable. There is the foresight that the internet of things (IoT) will take over the way logistical operations are managed today and in so doing it will reduce the staff numbers of many organisations worldwide.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: Paper given at and to be published in the Proceedings of 2020 International Conference on Computation, Automation and Knowledge Management (ICCAKM), 9-12th January,2020. Amity Dubai, UAE.
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
T Technology > T Technology (General)
Divisions: Business, Accountancy and Law > Business Logistics Innovation and Systems Research
General Research
Off-Campus Division
Depositing User: Professor S.R. Shah
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2020 11:50
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2020 11:50
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/2704

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