An investigation into why projects fail in agriculture, a case study of horticulture and food crops development project (HFCDP) in the central region of Malawi.

Namakhoma, Patrick Dayton (2015) An investigation into why projects fail in agriculture, a case study of horticulture and food crops development project (HFCDP) in the central region of Malawi. Masters thesis, University of Bolton.

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Patrick Dayton Namathoma Final dissertation report 23rd April, 2015.pdf - Submitted Version

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Abstract

This is a report of a research on an investigation into why projects fail in agriculture. It is a case study of a Malawi government’s horticulture and food crops development project (HFCDP) which was implemented in some districts of the central region of Malawi between 2002 and 2008. This research has been conducted as a requirement for an award for a Master of Science Degree in Project Management. The report covers the background of the study, literature review, research design and methodology, data collection and analysis, research findings, conclusions and recommendations. To a larger extent, the findings of the research showed that there were gaps in the initiation, planning and designing, execution, monitoring and closure of the HFCDP which led to its failure. The research findings were meant to inform project managers on the best way to manage projects in order to reduce project failure. In the academic circle, the findings of the research added new knowledge and insights on why projects fail in agriculture by bringing in contemporary knowledge from Malawi. The study recommended that projects need to involve right people with appropriate expertise, promote ownership, adopt bottom-up approach and assess contractors. It further recommended proper project monitoring, execution of situational assessment, need to undertake a comprehensive needs assessment, strengthen cooperatives and establishing linkages of the project beneficiaries to markets where they can sell their produce. The recommendations did not spare the introduction of project technologies which are simple, cost-effective and appropriate to community expertise and resources.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information: Electronic version of the dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Project Management awarded by University of Bolton in conjunction with Malawi Institute of Management
Divisions: University of Bolton Theses > Off-campus Division
Depositing User: Tracey Gill
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2017 14:53
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2019 08:13
URI: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk/id/eprint/1079

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